Real Estate Minute #….


Read the transcript below.

Location, location, location. It’s cliche, but it can’t be understated. You can have that perfect dream home everyone wants but if it’s situated “perfectly” where no one wants it, that makes things difficult. Obviously, location is important and aside from the outside factors like “walkability,” crime rate, and school districts, an even more obvious and important reason is because it’s immobile. It is where it is and it’s limited.

When you are ready to sell and you are looking at what you think you can get there are many tools and resources that you can consult. Online automated evaluation systems are great tools. They are everywhere and can give you a great idea of what taxes were paid on the property in the past and what the purchase price was the last time it was on the market. The automated systems, however, can’t decipher the market like a professional.

Whether you hire an appraiser or a real estate agent, hiring a professional is the best way to determine the TRUE value of your property. An appraiser will take in all the facts and measurements, the value of the area or street the home is on and then give you the value of your property based on comparable homes that have sold in the past six months. The real estate agent will take all of the same information into account and compare it to what is currently active, under contract, and what has recently sold versus the amount of buyers and ready home inventory to assess what you could possibly receive for your home.

Hiring a professional isn’t just to find a price, it’s to set a price. If you have an odd floor plan or have already moved your belongings out and even you can’t imagine how to furnish it, then it will definitely be harder for the buyer to imagine it. Leaving some furniture in strategic areas or hiring a staging or design team can make the difference between a house sitting on the market for days or weeks. If the home looks like a million bucks then maybe you set the price just a tad higher. Professionally staged homes tend to sell 17% quicker, according to the National Realtor Association. The buyer of course is going to have the numbers in their head, “how many bedrooms, bathrooms, etc.” but the majority of the time when it comes down to the final decision, it’s all emotions. You and your professional team need to grab hold of the buyer’s emotions and help them imagine living the next stage of their life in your home.

 

Tiny Houses

One of the biggest growing trends in the past decade  is the tiny house trend that is that has caught hold across the U.S. today, but has it caught in Utah? You can see it in nearly every home-related television show now-a-days, but what exactly is a “tiny home” and the lifestyle that comes with it? A Tiny home is defined as 100 to 400 square feet. Downsizing and living sparsely obviously come with the smaller space, but nicely enough it comes with a smaller price tag. One of the greatest appeals to tiny living is the lure of living debt free and still owning a place to call home.

“Debt free” has more than a nice ring to it; it’s got a near mesmerizing chime. But living tiny is just as it sounds, hard. Know the challenges that come with tiny. It’s not just the fact that you have to try and fit your entire life into 400 or fewer square feet. Its where do you plant your tiny roots? Many land parcels and subdivisions won’t allow for homes to be built less than 1000 square feet or park RVs fulltime (which the mobile tiny homes usually get referred to as). Do you have a foundation or wheels, or even how do the utilities work? These and many other things can be eccentric or just downright tricky, but the benefits are definitely there. According to thetinylife.com 68% of tiny homeowners don’t have a mortgage to pay every month, while 55% have more savings in the bank than the average American, and 89% of the tiny life community has less credit card debt than the average American. Tiny house living isn’t for everyone though.

Being sold direct from the builder and riding the gray area of zoning laws leaves tiny home finding their plots in more rural communities instead of the urban scene. In general, tiny housing is a lifestyle born out of necessity; a necessity that Utah doesn’t have. We are very much still growing. In 2016 Wasatch Front was recognized, by the National Association of Realtors, as home to more mansions than any other U.S. city. In 2017 Utah has been repeatedly been chosen among the top markets in the U.S. in Forbes, Realtor,  Tiny housing may catch along the Front soon, so don’t fret, but for now the tradition of larger families and backyard basketball courts keeps Utah housing on the larger end of the scale.

If you would like to learn more about tiny living in your community or just want to explore your options reach out to us here.

 

Death of a Shopko

A little over 27 years ago, developers negotiated with the city and RDA to develop the land and I-80 freeway exit in Sugar House. Part of the plan was to close off two streets and create the Sugar House shopping area we all know. Despite this, developers are again working on changing the shopping center. The days of Shopko and its large parking lot have come to an end. Soon, demolition of the Shopko will begin, and a new rebirth of the space will start to take place…

Check out the rest of our article at http://utahstories.com/2017/04/death-of-a-shopko/