Top Salt Lake City Neighborhoods for Buying a Charming Older Home

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Moving to Salt Lake City is one of the best decisions you’ll ever make. Salt Lake City has a unique history and is one of the countries most livable cities.

One of the best things about moving to Salt Lake City is the charming older homes. Here are SLC’s top historical neighborhoods.

SLC’s Top Historical Neighborhoods

Salt Lake City has 14 local historic districts, so you are sure to find what you are looking for. The city designates these districts to maintain their historic character.

This means you can be assured that the distinctive architecture of your neighborhood is protected over time. Here are three of SLC’s top historical neighborhoods.

The Avenues

One of Salt Lake City’s oldest and most significant residential areas, The Avenues became a local historic district in 1978. The Avenues is unique as it contains the broadest range of architectural styles in the state, starting in the 1860s. As a result, it is the perfect district for buying an old house. Other neighborhoods might be home to more luxury homes, but none have the diversity of The Avenues.

Over one hundred architect-designed homes are in The Avenues, with styles ranging from Queen Anne to Prairie Style. Such integration of architectural style is unique and gives The Avenues great character.

This diversity is due to the original subdivision of the blocks. Each block was divided into four lots. As the city evolved, more and more of the actual lots were subdivided. Thus, creating diversity dependent on the time of the subdivision.

Several important public buildings are also in the area, including the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church and the Madeleine Choir School.

Capitol Hill

The Capitol Hill district is the oldest residential area in Salt Lake City, with over 130 years of residential development. Capitol Hill became a local historic district in 1984.

The streets of the Capitol Hill area are not typical of the rest of Salt Lake City. This is a product of the steep hillside, making the area unattractive for redevelopment. Thus, preserving much of the historic buildings and sites.

The Capitol Hill District is a cross-section of the City’s historical resources and architecture. Ranging from the mansions of Arsenal Hill to the workmen’s cottages of Reed Street. The buildings in this district represent the original life of the city.

University

The University District has panoramic views extending over the city. The area mainly contains residences constructed between 1900 and 1920. The neighborhood was built to serve the university, with many homes being constructed for faculty and staff.

During the 1950s, the region also became occupied by students. This growth leads to the construction of apartment buildings which caused residents to seek its local historic district designation, granted in 1991.

Today the area contains primarily medium to large historic homes and apartments of a wide range of architectural styles. In addition, there are some commercial buildings geared towards the students located around the 200 south and 1300 east intersection. Many of which operate out of historic buildings.

The North East Corner is occupied by a historic park that has an art gallery.

Historic Districts in Salt Lake City

These three are our picks of SLC’s top historic neighborhoods, but with 11 others, you won’t have any trouble finding the right community and home for you.

For more information on relocating to Salt Lake City, find out everything you need to know here. We’ve got the best information for your upcoming relocation!

Differences Between Old and New Construction Homes

Differences Between Old and New Construction Homes

​The average potential buyer spends 10 weeks finding their home! Put yourself ahead of the competition by going into your house hunting journey by having a good idea of what you’re looking for before you get started.

One of the most important aspects of real estate is to familiarize yourself with the features of old vs. new homes. Read on to learn about the major differences.

Materials

Whoever said the phrase “they don’t make it like they used to” was probably talking about real estate.

Older homes are typically built with wood, while newer homes are usually made of concrete, depending on where you live. Even newer homes are built out of wood using a different wood quality than they did decades or even centuries ago.

It’s not just the base of the house that is built differently. Think plaster vs. drywall; old homes used plaster, a thick and almost concrete mixture when dried, while new homes have drywall, which is essentially a thick cardboard wall.  While drywall does have its benefits, it’s less durable.

Natural Light

This may not be something that a potential buyer would think of when buying a house, but it’s an aspect of the home design that can greatly impact the place’s vibe.

Older homes have more windows and let more light filter into the house. Newer models have energy-efficient, weather and light-blocking windows that help save money but let less sunlight in.

Energy

New homes are built with saving energy in mind, and the builders often tailor them to withstand the local weather.

Older homes may not be as energy-efficient because they were built before insulation became popular. In addition, houses built before 1965 have different electrical wiring systems that are much less effective and costly (fire hazard). However, if you fall in love with an old home but worry about the use and cost of energy, there is an option to rewire the house and take other measures to improve efficiency.

Design

Old construction homes tend to be smaller than new builds. For example, in 1960, the average square space of a new home was 1,289 square feet. In the 21st century, new constructions averaged around 2,500 square feet.

Old homes may have less surface area, but the design of old homes is conducive to feeling like there is more space. For example, older homes have narrower hallways that lead to large rooms with high ceilings. And there is certainly one thing for sure, old houses have more character than their new counterparts. Modern homes tend to have the same general open floor plan and are often described as cookie-cutter. However, old homes tend to have more personality. 

Location

Older homes tend to be closer to the city or town centers, while new construction is often pushed to the outskirts of town where there is space. Being secluded is a huge plus for some people, while others want to be right in the hustle and bustle.

Pricing

When you’re patrolling the market for a house, you’ll notice that older homes are usually less money per square foot than new builds. This is due to the rising cost of labor, land, and materials.

Teaming up with a real estate agent will give you the best opportunity to get a good deal.

You Decide: Old vs. New Homes

You’ve made your pros and cons list. You’ve considered all of the benefits of purchasing old vs. new homes. So now, how do you get your hands on a home to call your own?

Whether you fancy older construction homes or modern builds, Market Source Real Estate can get the home buying process started for you today. Contact one of our agents or browse our houses for sale in the Salt Lake City area.

New to Salt Lake City? Here’s Everything You Need to Know

If you’re new to Salt Lake City of a just in the process of planning to relocate to Salt Lake City then there are a few things you will want to know to make sure that you can your family get settled as quickly and easily as possible. This is our Salt Lake City Newcomers guide to get you on the right track.

New to Salt Lake City: Finding A Job

 

If you have moved to Salt Lake City and need to find a job then there are a lot of great resources available to help you find the perfect opportunity to suit you and your family life.

To help start your search you could try these resources:

 

New to Salt Lake City: Getting on the Road

 

If you are relocating to Salt Lake City from outside of Utah then you might need to think about getting your vehicle registered and getting a new state driver’s license.

If you are planning to get a new license there are a few steps to follow:

 

  1. Schedule an appointment online, or just walk into the office
  2. Complete the application form (you can do this online before you attend the appointment if you wish)
  3. Get a photo taken
  4. Give evidence that you have complete the appropriate driver training course. This can be done by giving over your current driver’s license. If you don’t want to do this you will have to get a learner’s permit and use that for 90 days
  5. Show proof of your identity, including your social security number and two proofs of your residence in Utah.
  6. You will have to take an eye exam and then, one or both a written and practical test.
  7. Pay a fee of $32 or $39 if you are 20 or under.

Some helpful links:

 

New to Salt Lake City: Enrolling your Kids in School

 

Before you decide exactly where you kids are going to go to school you will want to get the low down on the option available to you. After all a good education is one of the key’s ingredients to the American dream.

 

New to Salt Lake City: Registering to Vote

 

Getting registered to vote in your new state is a big deal. You don’t want to miss out on the chance to have your voice heard so make sure you get yourself signed up. If you are getting a Utah driver’s license you will be asked then if you wish to register to vote, so you can kill two birds with one stone. 

You can also register to vote online, it’s really easy to do, so there’s no reason to put it off.

7 Things to Know About Homeowners Associations

Homeowners Associations

Did you know that around 80% of newly built homes belong to a homeowners association (HOA)? Planned communities are on the rise, but what does it mean to live within one of these neighborhoods?

What is an HOA, and what does an HOA do? Keep reading to learn all about homeowners associations here.

What is a Homeowners Association (HOA)?

A homeowners association (HOA) is an organization within planned communities or townhouse and condominium developments. HOAs oversee the properties in their jurisdiction and create and enforce communal areas and member’s properties. In this way, your investment is protected and even causes an increase in home value.

Fees Range Widely

When joining an HOA, you have to pay a particular set of fees. HOA fees are paid monthly to support community maintenance, civic amenities (sanitation, recycling, and some utilities), access to facilities (residential pool, gym, clubhouses, rec center, etc.,) and other expenses.

Some communities also cover lawn care, snow removal, and pest control for tenants with HOA fees.

These fees can range widely depending on what the HOA offers, type of home, location, and size of the community. On average, payments range from $200-$300 for single homes.

Additional Fees May Apply

Standard HOA fees included in your contract do not tend to change. However, you may be subject to pay additional fees. HOAs may charge for special assessments to pay for renovations in the neighborhood; some renovations (and charges) are unexpected, so it is best to add this to your budget.

Other fees you may face are fines. When you sign the contract, you agree to comply with those rules. If you violate an enforced regulation, like excessive noise or unapproved design changes, you could receive a warning or fine.

Insurance

HOAs provide insurance coverage and liability protections for communal properties in their jurisdiction.

Regardless of whether you make use of amenities like a fitness center or parking garage, you are still responsible for paying the HOA “master policy.” Master policies may protect aspects of your home but still need a personal plan for your condo or home.

Fees And Your Mortgage Approval

The fees you pay to an HOA may impact your mortgage qualification abilities. Lenders consider these fees when determining whether you will be able to pay back your loan.

Your DTI (debt to income) ratio may lower your offers or approval odds.

The HOA’s Reputation

Is an HOA bad? Is an HOA good?

HOAs tend to get a bad rep due to poorly managed organizations, overly strict guidelines, or lack of communication. There are plenty of positive aspects of belonging to an HOA; however, you should always read any paperwork in detail and consider whether you can afford the dues and additional fees before joining a community headed by one.

Compliance With The HOA

Rules and regulations are outlined in a Declaration of Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions (CC&R).

CC&Rs let tenants (or prospective buyers) know about membership dues when payments are made, your rights as members, and the limitations. As HOA, you have to comply with restrictions on paint colors, the state of your yard, and so on.

What Are The Amenities, Parking, and Pet Restrictions?

HOA amenities are often limited to members who pay for those services (with HOA fees). Parking is commonly restricted to certain vehicles, where to park, or how many cars per single home.

Lastly, pets may be restricted to one or two per household, specific breeds, weights/sizes, and enforce leash and collar rules.

Consider These 7 Things Before Making Your Decision About Homeowners Associations

The benefits of joining a homeowners association are plentiful. Consider the fees, insurance, regulations, and restrictions when making your decision whether or not to join a neighborhood with an HOA. Want to know more about your home buying options in Salt Lake City?

Contact us here or check out our blog for more information about moving to SLC, Utah.

Best Spots for Commuters: North of Salt Lake or South of Salt Lake

Best Spots for Commuters: North of Salt Lake or South of Salt Lake

If you live in the SLC area of Utah, you’ve probably noticed the recent population boom we’ve been experiencing.

People are moving to the SLC area in record numbers. As a result, the surrounding suburbs are starting to receive a lot more attention.

Living on the outskirts of Salt Lake City gives homebuyers the best of both worlds. They can enjoy a nice, quiet neighborhood to raise the family and still be close enough to the downtown area, where most homebuyers work.

But, what are some of the commuter spots in South and North SLC? Read on, and we will answer all that and more by the end of this article!

Commuter Spots in South and North SLC

If you’re wondering where to search for a home in the SLC area, let us help point you in the right direction.

Without further ado, here is our carefully cultivated list of the best commuter spots in the surrounding SLC area:

Central City

Central City is known as the “first hipster hangout” in the SLC area. The neighborhood boasts an eclectic mix of food spots, bars, and nightlife.

The area is also bike-friendly. It provides a great connection between downtown SLC and other nearby neighborhoods, such as Sugarhouse. 

Rio Grande

The Rio Grande is the perfect up-and-coming neighborhood for first-time homebuyers. The area is going through a major transition and is getting a lot of help from local government agencies.

A great bureaucratic effort is underway to make this neighborhood the sparkling jewel of the SLC area. People looking for value when purchasing a home should focus on Rio Grande.

East Central

The East Central neighborhood is another great suburb of the SLC area. Residents are sold on its walkability, the fact that it’s pet-friendly, and the quality of the schools within the area.

The area also has many interesting shops, restaurants, and eateries, which are also walkable.

Liberty Wells

Liberty Wells is known as the “first suburb” of the SLC area. In the 1890s, when the neighborhood began, it was the first area outside downtown SLC to receive streetcar service.

Liberty Wells is another walkable neighborhood. Its location close to the freeways also makes it desirable for commuters.

Bonneville Hills

Bonneville Hills is a predominantly residential neighborhood close to downtown SLC. It is also close to the regional shopping mall of the area, which is a major convenience.

Sunnyside East Golf Course, as well as other outdoor amenities, are nearby as well.

Bonneville Hills is similar to the older neighborhoods of the SLC area like East Bench. If you’re looking for an area with historic charm, where you can still take advantage of all SLC has to offer, Bonneville Hills might be for you.

Selling SLC

If you’re looking to sell your property in SLC, now is the time. Get your unit on the market with us!

We pride ourselves on our expertise in the area and the lengths we go to for our clients.

We can give you a market analysis of north vs. south SLC, so you can see exactly how your home will perform in the market.

So, what are you waiting for? Contact us today to get started!