Top Salt Lake City Neighborhoods for Buying a Charming Older Home

Market Source 928 N Terrace Hills

Moving to Salt Lake City is one of the best decisions you’ll ever make. Salt Lake City has a unique history and is one of the countries most livable cities.

One of the best things about moving to Salt Lake City is the charming older homes. Here are SLC’s top historical neighborhoods.

SLC’s Top Historical Neighborhoods

Salt Lake City has 14 local historic districts, so you are sure to find what you are looking for. The city designates these districts to maintain their historic character.

This means you can be assured that the distinctive architecture of your neighborhood is protected over time. Here are three of SLC’s top historical neighborhoods.

The Avenues

One of Salt Lake City’s oldest and most significant residential areas, The Avenues became a local historic district in 1978. The Avenues is unique as it contains the broadest range of architectural styles in the state, starting in the 1860s. As a result, it is the perfect district for buying an old house. Other neighborhoods might be home to more luxury homes, but none have the diversity of The Avenues.

Over one hundred architect-designed homes are in The Avenues, with styles ranging from Queen Anne to Prairie Style. Such integration of architectural style is unique and gives The Avenues great character.

This diversity is due to the original subdivision of the blocks. Each block was divided into four lots. As the city evolved, more and more of the actual lots were subdivided. Thus, creating diversity dependent on the time of the subdivision.

Several important public buildings are also in the area, including the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church and the Madeleine Choir School.

Capitol Hill

The Capitol Hill district is the oldest residential area in Salt Lake City, with over 130 years of residential development. Capitol Hill became a local historic district in 1984.

The streets of the Capitol Hill area are not typical of the rest of Salt Lake City. This is a product of the steep hillside, making the area unattractive for redevelopment. Thus, preserving much of the historic buildings and sites.

The Capitol Hill District is a cross-section of the City’s historical resources and architecture. Ranging from the mansions of Arsenal Hill to the workmen’s cottages of Reed Street. The buildings in this district represent the original life of the city.

University

The University District has panoramic views extending over the city. The area mainly contains residences constructed between 1900 and 1920. The neighborhood was built to serve the university, with many homes being constructed for faculty and staff.

During the 1950s, the region also became occupied by students. This growth leads to the construction of apartment buildings which caused residents to seek its local historic district designation, granted in 1991.

Today the area contains primarily medium to large historic homes and apartments of a wide range of architectural styles. In addition, there are some commercial buildings geared towards the students located around the 200 south and 1300 east intersection. Many of which operate out of historic buildings.

The North East Corner is occupied by a historic park that has an art gallery.

Historic Districts in Salt Lake City

These three are our picks of SLC’s top historic neighborhoods, but with 11 others, you won’t have any trouble finding the right community and home for you.

For more information on relocating to Salt Lake City, find out everything you need to know here. We’ve got the best information for your upcoming relocation!

New to Salt Lake City? Here’s Everything You Need to Know

If you’re new to Salt Lake City of a just in the process of planning to relocate to Salt Lake City then there are a few things you will want to know to make sure that you can your family get settled as quickly and easily as possible. This is our Salt Lake City Newcomers guide to get you on the right track.

New to Salt Lake City: Finding A Job

 

If you have moved to Salt Lake City and need to find a job then there are a lot of great resources available to help you find the perfect opportunity to suit you and your family life.

To help start your search you could try these resources:

 

New to Salt Lake City: Getting on the Road

 

If you are relocating to Salt Lake City from outside of Utah then you might need to think about getting your vehicle registered and getting a new state driver’s license.

If you are planning to get a new license there are a few steps to follow:

 

  1. Schedule an appointment online, or just walk into the office
  2. Complete the application form (you can do this online before you attend the appointment if you wish)
  3. Get a photo taken
  4. Give evidence that you have complete the appropriate driver training course. This can be done by giving over your current driver’s license. If you don’t want to do this you will have to get a learner’s permit and use that for 90 days
  5. Show proof of your identity, including your social security number and two proofs of your residence in Utah.
  6. You will have to take an eye exam and then, one or both a written and practical test.
  7. Pay a fee of $32 or $39 if you are 20 or under.

Some helpful links:

 

New to Salt Lake City: Enrolling your Kids in School

 

Before you decide exactly where you kids are going to go to school you will want to get the low down on the option available to you. After all a good education is one of the key’s ingredients to the American dream.

 

New to Salt Lake City: Registering to Vote

 

Getting registered to vote in your new state is a big deal. You don’t want to miss out on the chance to have your voice heard so make sure you get yourself signed up. If you are getting a Utah driver’s license you will be asked then if you wish to register to vote, so you can kill two birds with one stone. 

You can also register to vote online, it’s really easy to do, so there’s no reason to put it off.

How to Find the Right Neighborhood for Your Family

family neighborhood

Before kids, your choice of neighborhood probably came down to: can I afford it? Is it close to work? 

Now that you have a family, schools, safety, and access to amenities are just the start. How do you know which is the best family neighborhood in your city?

We’ve got you covered. Below are six great things to consider when looking for a neighborhood for you and your family.

Consider Your Lifestyle Needs

Some families are outdoorsy and active, always on the go. For that reason, the heart of the city may not be the best neighborhood for your family. Other families prefer the variety of music lessons and sports teams offered downtown.

Knowing what your lifestyle requires or what you want to offer for your kids as they grow up is key. Maybe your child has certain medical needs that require you to be close to a hospital. Please make a list of your family needs and keep it handy as you research where to move. 

Take Advantage of the Internet

Trust us; the internet is going to be your best friend during this process. There are a few ways you can use it to your advantage.

First, research schools that fall within the districts of your top choice neighborhoods. Look at their school assessments. You want to move to a place with schools at the same level or better than the ones your kids are attending now.

You can even tour each new house you find by looking into virtual tours. See what’s available in different parts of town.  

Visit Your New Neighborhood or Town

Once you’ve narrowed down your choices, take a drive to those neighborhoods. Bring the whole family and spend a day walking around.

Visit the shops or local attractions to get a feel for what it’s like. Take a look at how clean the roads are and whether there are signs of vandalism.

Neighborhood visits can be extra useful in helping teenagers adjust to a new place. They can picture what their lives might be like, get a sense of how they’ll make new friends and what activities they’ll join.

Drive Through During Different Times of the Day

To get a true feel for the neighborhood when you visit, drive through it at different parts of the day. Morning traffic may be more than you’re willing to take on. All the theater, music, and sports activities may not start until 7 pm.

Contact the Local Police Department

Did you know you can research a neighborhood’s safety rating online? If you’d rather talk to someone in the know, you can also contact local police departments. 

Local police can direct you to resources on crime statistics. Ask them for suggestions on neighborhoods with the highest safety ratings.

Evaluate Other Cost of Living Factors

Here’s where pesky things like income rates, gas prices, and commute times come into play. If you find a great new home that’s 45 minutes away, are you willing to spend more time and money commuting every day?

Is the minimum wage going to help your teens save for college or pay for gas? Are jobs growing and houses going up in value? Then you’re likely making a great investment. 

Finding the Best Family Neighborhood

Don’t rush into your next move. The right home in the right location will be a place to make memories for years to come. Use these tips to feel confident that you’ve found the perfect family neighborhood. 

So you’ve landed in the right neighborhood? Now you need to find the perfect house. To get started, contact one of our real estate agents.

How to Help Your Teenager Transition When Moving to Salt Lake City

How to Help Your Teenager Transition When Moving to Salt Lake City

Moving to a new city is often a difficult adventure for everyone involved, but even more so for children. They’ll need to leave behind friends and comfort in favor of forging new bonds all over again. It affects them in ways that last for years.

That’s why it’s vital to find ways to make the move as seamless and stress-free as possible.

If your family is moving to Salt Lake City, then we’re here to help. Listed down below are several ways to help your teenager learn how to cope with moving.

Look For Exciting Places in the Area

The next step should involve looking for points of interest in the area you plan to live in. Places like cool bike trails, shopping plazas, or movie theaters are ways to get the family excited about the move.

They’ll have something positive to focus on, rather than only focusing on the negative parts of moving.

Visit the New School

Moving to a new school is the hardest part your teen will face during a move. That’s why it’s essential to give them a chance to scope out the new school before being thrown into the deep end.

If possible, take a trip together to visit the school and check out the main features of the building. They’re going to be spending a lot of time there, so it’s a significant relief to know where to go. It gives them a chance to focus on other things when the first day at school begins.

It could even facilitate a few new friendships along the way, which is an essential part of every teen’s life.

Encourage Involvement

Many of us don’t know how to deal with moving since it’s such a stressful time. Whenever it comes to making different decisions, try to involve your teenager in the discussions.

By asking for their help or their opinion, it gives them a semblance of control in this situation. It’ll make them feel as though their point of view matters and they’re not being dragged into something they don’t want. Instead, they’ll have a voice in the decision, and it’ll make them accept the transition more easily.

Expect Some Rebellion

Learning how to deal with moving is a different journey for everyone. Some teens might take to the change with an open heart, while others will act out until things normalize again.

As a parent, it’s good to expect some form of rebellion from your teen. Try to remain calm and accepting during this challenging time so that the situation doesn’t escalate. Sooner or later, your teen will find ways to love their new city.

Moving to Salt Lake City With a Teenager Takes Extra Care

Although moving to Salt Lake City opens up a lot of beautiful new avenues for the entire family, your teenager might not see it that way for a while. It’ll take time and effort to help your teen learn to love their new home.

With the help of these tips, that transition will be a whole lot easier.

Are you looking for a new home in this beautiful city? Contact us today to find the perfect match for you and your family!

4 Practical Tips for Downsizing and Moving Into a Smaller Home

Downsizing and Moving Into a Smaller Home

Size matters when it comes to your home, but not in the way you may expect. In fact, 60% of people who live in homes over 2,000 square feet would choose a smaller house over a larger one.

Downsizing is a fantastic way to save money, save maintenance time, and reap the rewards of a more minimalistic lifestyle. It can be an overwhelming task from the start, though. Stop stressing with these easy tips on downsizing to a smaller home.

1. Downsize Your Stuff First

A common mistake that downsizers make is choosing a home first and then trying to downsize their possessions to fit it. It’s better to work in the opposite direction.

Go through everything in your home and do a major purge. Sell or donate anything you don’t need. It’s a good idea to start this process early, so you have plenty of time to sell items.

This way, you have a more accurate idea of how much space you truly need in your next home. You’ll also know where that space needs to be.

For instance, perhaps you still have a lot of kitchen items but little clothing. You’ll want a home that has plenty of space in the kitchen but minimal closet space.

2. Get Detailed Measurements

When choosing your downsized home, always have a tape measure handy. Take detailed measurements of each room unless these details are already available.

Use these measurements to see whether your furniture would fit and how you would arrange it. If the home doesn’t fit your furniture, are you willing to sell and replace your furniture?

If you’ve already bought or leased the home, you can still put your measurements to use. Plan out how to arrange each room’s furniture in advance to make the move smoother. Be sure to consider essential layout rules in the process.

3. Make Everything Multifunctional

One of the top tricks to living in a small space is to rely on multifunctional pieces. For instance, furniture should also offer storage space or convert to other types of furniture.

The same goes for decor: storage can be stylish if you find the right items.

4. Consider Space Alternatives

After you’ve downsized your possessions, make sure you think about all your options. For instance, you might see that you have a lot of items you store in your basement. You’d assume your new home also needs a basement or a lot of storage space.

In reality, it may be cheaper to choose a home with little storage space and rent a self-storage unit instead.

The Best of Our Tips on Downsizing to a Smaller Home: Find the Right Real Estate Agent

Any time you move, your real estate agent will play a significant role in the process. If you’re downsizing, you need an agent who understands your priorities and respects them. Some agents may try to push you toward a larger house than you need, so they earn a higher commission.

Among all our tips on downsizing to a smaller home, the most important one is to select an agent who will uphold your best interests instead. For an agent, you can trust, reach out to our Utah realty team today.

Relocating to Salt Lake City? Here’s Where to Start!

So you’re relocating to Salt Lake City? We’re proud to say that Market Source Real Estate has helped countless clients move from other states to the greater Salt Lake City area.  We’re pros at helping you find the neighborhoods that fit your lifestyle and interests.  We can also help you figure out the logistics of the move and some amazing things to explore when you arrive!

Here are some of the resources we’ve compiled just for you to get started.  When you’re ready for the next step in relocating to Salt Lake City, give us a call and we’ll help you through the entire process!

I’m relocating to Salt Lake City?  Where should I start my home search?

 

How much does it cost to live in Salt Lake City?

When relocating to Salt Lake City, you always want to figure out the cost of living.  Here are a few sites to help:

 

Done relocating to Salt Lake City.  Now, how do I get around?

 

Now that I’m here, how do I find a job in Salt Lake City?

Usually when people relocate to Salt Lake City, they have a job lined up.  BUT here are some useful resources in case you haven’t found the dream job yet.

Looking for some more information about relocating to Salt Lake City?

Get the local scoop from some of our other blog posts about Salt Lake City:

 

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