Differences Between Old and New Construction Homes

​The average potential buyer spends 10 weeks finding their home! Put yourself ahead of the competition by going into your house hunting journey by having a good idea of what you’re looking for before you get started.

One of the most important aspects of real estate is to familiarize yourself with the features of old vs. new homes. Read on to learn about the major differences.

Materials

Whoever said the phrase “they don’t make it like they used to” was probably talking about real estate.

Older homes are typically built with wood, while newer homes are usually made of concrete, depending on where you live. Even newer homes are built out of wood using a different wood quality than they did decades or even centuries ago.

It’s not just the base of the house that is built differently. Think plaster vs. drywall; old homes used plaster, a thick and almost concrete mixture when dried, while new homes have drywall, which is essentially a thick cardboard wall.  While drywall does have its benefits, it’s less durable.

Natural Light

This may not be something that a potential buyer would think of when buying a house, but it’s an aspect of the home design that can greatly impact the place’s vibe.

Older homes have more windows and let more light filter into the house. Newer models have energy-efficient, weather and light-blocking windows that help save money but let less sunlight in.

Energy

New homes are built with saving energy in mind, and the builders often tailor them to withstand the local weather.

Older homes may not be as energy-efficient because they were built before insulation became popular. In addition, houses built before 1965 have different electrical wiring systems that are much less effective and costly (fire hazard). However, if you fall in love with an old home but worry about the use and cost of energy, there is an option to rewire the house and take other measures to improve efficiency.

Design

Old construction homes tend to be smaller than new builds. For example, in 1960, the average square space of a new home was 1,289 square feet. In the 21st century, new constructions averaged around 2,500 square feet.

Old homes may have less surface area, but the design of old homes is conducive to feeling like there is more space. For example, older homes have narrower hallways that lead to large rooms with high ceilings. And there is certainly one thing for sure, old houses have more character than their new counterparts. Modern homes tend to have the same general open floor plan and are often described as cookie-cutter. However, old homes tend to have more personality. 

Location

Older homes tend to be closer to the city or town centers, while new construction is often pushed to the outskirts of town where there is space. Being secluded is a huge plus for some people, while others want to be right in the hustle and bustle.

Pricing

When you’re patrolling the market for a house, you’ll notice that older homes are usually less money per square foot than new builds. This is due to the rising cost of labor, land, and materials.

Teaming up with a real estate agent will give you the best opportunity to get a good deal.

You Decide: Old vs. New Homes

You’ve made your pros and cons list. You’ve considered all of the benefits of purchasing old vs. new homes. So now, how do you get your hands on a home to call your own?

Whether you fancy older construction homes or modern builds, Market Source Real Estate can get the home buying process started for you today. Contact one of our agents or browse our houses for sale in the Salt Lake City area.